Frequently Asked Questions

 

WHEN SHOULD YOU TRY PSYCHOTHERAPY?

Psychotherapy is useful when you’re feeling stuck.  You may be repeating self-destructive behaviors, choosing the same kind of relationship that failed before, or saying things to your children that you swore you would never say or do. Therapy can also help during times of loss or trauma. Things might feel out of control and your normal sources of comfort aren’t able to help.  Your relationship may be falling apart, or you may be suffering from depression or isolation.  In some cases, life may lack meaning or everyday stresses may create unbearable anxiety.  These are the times that psychotherapy can help.


HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?

The cost of psychotherapy varies depending on the service provided and the length of the session.  This is something to discuss, in person, with your therapist.


CAN I USE MY INSURANCE TO PAY FOR THERAPY?

To determine if you have mental health coverage, please check with your insurance carrier.  Check your coverage carefully and find the answers to the following questions:
  • What are my mental health benefits?
  • Do I have a co-payment, and if so, how much?
  • How many therapy sessions does my plan cover?
  • Will my insurance pay for an out-of-network provider, and if so, how much?
  • Is approval required from my primary care physician?
  • Do I need pre-authorization, and if so, how often?
  • What is mailing address and provider phone number for my carrier


WHAT MAKES PRIVATE THERAPY DIFFERENT FROM MANAGED CARE?

With managed care psychotherapy, the focus and type of treatment is determined by the insurance company.  Treatment updates are frequently required by the insurance company to insure continued visits.


HOW LONG DOES THERAPY TAKE?

The length of therapy will be determined by you.  Some people come for a short period of time to solve an immediate, specific problem.  Other people choose to do longer-term, in-depth therapy to work on deeper, more chronic issues.


WHAT’S A THERAPY SESSION LIKE?

Typically, a therapy session begins with the therapist getting to know the client.  The client usually tells the therapist the nature of the problem, the issues he/she is grappling with and the various symptoms the person is experiencing.  Usually a session lasts from 45-50 minutes and is almost always in-person.   Usually weekly or twice weekly sessions are best.  The therapist is listening on a variety of levels, helping the client explore these issues in greater depth, striving for insights and understanding.  Sometimes, the therapist will ask questions, offer insights and support.  Other times, the therapist might give direct advice.  Much of what happens in the therapy session is determined by the needs of the client.


IS PSYCHOTHERAPY CONFIDENTIAL?

In general, the law protects the confidentiality of all communications between a client and a psychotherapist.  Information is not disclosed without written permission. However, there are number of exceptions to this rule.  Exceptions include:
  • Suspected child abuse or dependent adult or elder abuse. The therapist is required by law to report this to the appropriate authorities immediately.
  • If a client is threatening serious bodily harm to another person/s. The therapist must notify the police and inform the intended victim.
  • If a client intends to harm himself or herself. The therapist will make every effort to enlist their cooperation in insuring their safety. If they do not cooperate, further measures may be taken without their permission in order to ensure their safety.